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Academic

Courses for Non-DAAP Majors

 

Courses at the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning aren't just for DAAP majors! We offer several classes for non-DAAP majors to learn about anything from photography to video production and animation. Check out the class offerings for the upcoming summer and fall semesters below:

 

DAAP Course Offerings for Summer Semester 2017

DAAP 2011 Fundamentals of Photography Design for non-DAAP majors (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         73087                     T 6:00pm-8:50pm

Explore the visual fundamentals of photographic design. Learn how to effectively use F-stops, shutter speed, ISO, and the various modes of a digital camera to improve your photographs and communicate your ideas. Investigate compositional techniques as they relate to photographing people, the landscape, and movement. Discover how line, form, value, color, and texture can be organized to enhance visual communication and improve interpretation.

 

DAAP 2026 The Art of Jewelry and Leather Accessory Design (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         73269                     TR 6:00pm-8:50pm                                            


This course explores jewelry and leather design as it relates to contemporary art, fashion, culture and society. The course will offer a balance of art making, broad range of techniques and materials, critiquing, collaboration, and art history knowledge. In addition, the course will include a guest lecture, field trip and demonstrations. Students will investigate the basics of working with non-precious metals, wire, chain, findings, found objects, and selected leathers as an introduction to jewelry fabrication and small scale leather design. These parts will be used collectively to provide students with a working vocabulary, a concrete skill set and understanding of jewelry making and small scale leather processes. Assignments will stress originality, careful planning and design, exploration of materials, and quality craftsmanship. Throughout the semester, students will conceptualize and create their own designs from the techniques learned in the course. This course is designed as an introduction for non-majors as well as skill development for majors or transfer students.

DSGN 1030 Basic Sewing (3 credit hours; BOK: CT)

001         72358                   MoWe 3:00PM-5:50PM

This course provides an introduction to construction techniques and procedures. Students will focus on developing their construction skills while building their understanding of relevant techniques used for various fabrics. As students construct sample elements (seam finishing's, hem finishing's, interfacings, stitch lengths, zippers, etc.) from assorted fabrics, a strong emphasis is placed on the utilization of appropriate structural design techniques and methodologies.

 

FAA 1029 Basic Wheel Throwing for non-DAAP majors (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         70601                     MoWe 9:00AM- 1:00pm

This course will provide an introduction to wheel throwing and the technical processes of working with clay. Students will explore wheel throwing with terra cotta as way to make both functional and expressive works out of clay. The class is divided into two components: a one- hour "lecture" portion, which may include demonstrations, critiques, and clay and glaze calculation and testing and a two hour "Lab" component in which students are engaged in the creation of works of art related to the course subject. No prior ceramic experience is needed for this course. This course will work through many different stages of throwing on the potter's wheel, starting with cylinders and moving into vases, bowls, cups and saucers, and plates. This class is will also focus on different methods of decorating and glazing earthenware. Concepts are developed alongside the building process, using a variety of techniques to create dynamic functional and sculptural pieces. These pieces will be evaluated in both individual and group critiques throughout the semester. Students will be exposed to past and present ceramic history through in class presentations and historical research projects. - Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Be enrolled in one of these Programs 40UOP, 35ASC, 35BAC, 35CRT, 15MAJ, 15ASC, 15BAC, 15CRT, 15MIN, 35MIN, 32ASC, 32BAC, 32CRT, 16BAC, 16CRT, 16MIN, 20ASC, 20BAC, 20BC, 20CRT, 20MIN, 18ASC, 18BAC, 18BC, 18CRT, 18MIN, 34ASC, 34BAC, 34CRT, 22ASC, 22BAC, 22CRT, 22HON, 22MIN, 26BAC, 26MIN, 29BAC, 25BAC, 36CRT, 28ASC, 28BAC, 28CRT, 38HON, 38CRT.

 

FAA 1034 Basic Ceramic Handbuilding for non-DAAP majors (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001        70603                  MoWe 1:25PM - 4:15PM

This course will provide an introduction to hand forming and the technical processes of working with clay. Students will explore handbuilding with terra cotta as a way to make both functional and expressive works out of clay. We will work with many different building methods, such as coiling, pinch pots, slab building, and the use of molds. This class is will also focus on different methods of decorating and glazing earthenware. No prior ceramic experience is needed for this course.
 

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HORT 1010 Horticulture Science I (3 credit hours; BOK: NS)

001         72961                     TuTh 11:00AM - 12:20PM

This course is an introduction to basic horticulture science concepts and principles including the development, growth, distribution, and utilization of fruits, vegetables, and ornamental plants. The course will focus on botanical concepts of plant structure, growth, and development, and the plants' response to environmental conditions and management techniques.

 

HORT 1030 Native Plants and Communities I (3 credit hours; BOK: NS)

001         73078                     ThFr 9:00AM - 6:00PM; WeThFrSa 9:00AM - 6:00PM; ThFr 9:00AM - 6:00PM

The course is a survey of the native plants and plant communities of southwestern Ohio. The course develops an awareness of natural vegetative patterns of central hardwood forest types, prairies, and wetlands, and will discuss issues that threaten native plant communities. The course covers the morphology, taxonomy, and biology of indigenous Eastern US plants in a combination of classroom and field studies.

 

HORT 1081 Cinti Summer Hort (3 credit hours; BOK: NS)

001         72960                     We 6:00PM - 8:50PM

This survey of horticulture provides a broad look at current issues in horticulture today for non-majors. General plant biology will be examined including plant classification, general morphological structures and physiological functions. The course will also look at issues of human dependence on plants including topics in agriculture, agronomy, vegetable gardening, fruit production, and principles of landscape design. For non-majors only.

 

HORT 3044 Urban Landscape IV: Roofs and Facades (3 credit hours; BOK: CT KI SR)

001         72955   TuTH 1:15PM- 2:45PM

This course is an introduction to the benefits, design, construction, and maintenance of vegetated roofs and facades to improve environmental quality and the quality of life. Readings, field trips, discussion, and lectures will introduce students to the current literature, agencies, research, standards, and policies supporting the implementation of vegetated roofs and exterior walls in North America. Lectures will introduce students to best practices for integrating vegetated roofs and walls into site and building systems to support sustainable strategies.

 

HORT 3045 Urban Landscape V: Interiors (3 credit hours; BOK: CM IL KI SR)

001         73079                     MoWe 6:00-8:50pm

This course introduces students to the benefits, planning, and design of interior landscaping in commercial and institutional buildings. Lectures and field studies will review the identification and culture of foliage plants for interior plantings and living walls, and the fundamental issues of planning, design, installation, and maintenance of interior landscapes.

 

HORT 4080 Hops and History: Introduction to Beer (3 credit hours; BOK: CT KI)

001         72956                     MoWe 6:30PM - 9:30PM

This course is an introduction to beer and the many aspects of beer brewing and drinking that are influenced by culture, history, and geography. Through brewery tours, we will learn the art and science of beer making and ingredients. Through field trips to the Brewery District in Over-the-Rhine we will see how beer has influenced Cincinnati culture and urban form. Beers from around the world will be discussed and tasted to demonstrate a wide range of beer styles, ingredients, and cultural preferences. Students will learn to describe the taste of beer and develop their palette to assess a beer for appearance, aroma, and flavor. Students must be 21 years of age or older. A fee will be charged to cover the cost of materials.

 

HORT 4082 Introduction to Wine (3 credit hours; BOK: CT)

002         72957                     MoWe 6:30PM - 9:30PM

This course is an introduction to wine and a review of many aspects of wine that are influenced by and influencing culture, history, geography, and economies. Through readings and discussion, this course reviews wine-making, health issues, the senses and their responses to wine, wine and food, and the taste of wine. Wine tastings of over 50 examples are designed to present practical experience with how vinification, viticulture, and terroir express themselves in the glass, as well as the differences that vintage, clonal origin and country of origin influence the flavors and textures of the final product. A fee is required to cover the cost of course materials. Students must be 21 years of age or older.

 

NOTES:

All Horticulture courses are open for non-DAAP students, provided they have met the appropriate prerequisites or have permission of the instructor.

All of the SOP courses are open to non-DAAP majors. This is based on seating availability which we have not found to be a problem in the past. Our studios (PLAN 1012, 3031) and capstones/thesis (PLAN 5099, 7008, 7009) courses will allow non-DAAP majors if the topic pertains to their area of study and they possess the skills and ability to join the course. These courses would require professor permission for non-DAAP majors to enroll.

Questions? Contact DAAP Student Affairs at 556-1376. Thank you!

 

 

DAAP Course Offerings for Fall Semester 2017

ARCH 5126 Techniques of Historic Preservation (3 credit hours)

001         16445                     TuTh 3:30PM - 4:50PM

This lecture and lab course introduces methods used to research the history and significance of an historic building or site, and to evaluate and rehabilitate historic structures. The course actively engages a variety of historic building construction systems, and develops in the student an understanding of these methods and systems through structured field activities. Lectures by Cincinnati restoration craftspeople as well as DAAP faculty highlight problems and restoration techniques associated with each examined construction material or system. The documentation, of an historic structure is a required service-learning component of the course.

 

ARTE 1009 Art LIVE! (3 credit hours; BOK: DC, FA)

001         19780                     Th 2:00PM - 4:50PM

Have FUN...Experience Art/Culture...Get Credit...Nuff Said. #UcArtLive

Most ARTH courses are open to non-DAAP majors. The following courses provide an introduction to the history of art:

 

ARTH 1001 History of Art I (3 credit hours; BOK: FA, HP)

001         15320                     MWF 10:10-11:05am

This is the first of the two-semester survey of world art. It covers movements, monuments, and figures in art and architecture between ca. 25,000 B.C. & ca. 1300. Students will learn to appreciate and analyze the formal qualities of the important works of art and architecture. They will also learn to investigate how these creations reflect contemporary social, political, religious, and philosophical contexts.


ARTH 1002 History of Art II (3 credit hours; BOK: FA, HP)

001         15321                     MWF 11:15am-12:10pm

This is the second of the two-semester survey of world art. It covers movements, monuments, and figures in art and architecture from the 14th century to the 21st century. Students will learn to appreciate and analyze the formal qualities of the important works of art and architecture. They will also learn to investigate how these creations reflect contemporary social, political, religious, and philosophical contexts.

 

DAAP 1011 Design, Art and the Built Environment (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         21321                     MWF 11:15a-12:10p

This introductory course will provide you with an overview of the disciplines within the College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning at the University of Cincinnati. This course will help you understand, identify, analyze, and interpret your built historic and visual surroundings in transformative ways that will enable you to become a critical participant in your community. As participants in this course students will be asked to engage in observation, investigation, analysis and evaluation. These skills will be put to use as you encounter your surrounding environment, community, and work with your peers. You will also have the chance to listen and respond to lectures given by discipline-specific professors. There are no prerequisites for this course yet you will be required to:·Work in peer groups both in class and on discussion board ·Take photographs and both print and upload.jpg files as part of your assignments ·Watch, evaluate, and then comment on DAAP projects that will be showcased for you on blackboard. Your evaluations, judgments and comments may be drawn upon in-class, on discussion board, in a class blog or a self-reflective writing.

 

DAAP 1012 Race and Identity in American Culture (3 credit hours; BOK: FA, DC)

001         21323                     MoWeFr 2:30PM - 3:25PM

This course survey the national and racial atmosphere of the United States from the colonial period to the 20th century, through a study of both visual culture and literature. Some of the topics we examine include the visual encoding of racism in American art, issues of racial identity and representation, the tumultuous decades surrounding the Civil War and the role race played in the nation's coping with war, American nationalism related to landscape and Manifest Destiny.

 

DAAP 1013 Art Appreciation (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         21322                     MoWeFr 11:15AM - 12:10PM

This is an introduction for non-majors to the visual arts, through the study of media, processes, technologies, styles, cultures, and concepts related to the visual arts. Students will develop a vocabulary for discussing art as well as skills for thinking about visual art, art making, art patronage, and more!

 

ARTH 1040 Survey of East Asian art (3 credit hours; BOK: DC, HP)

001         15322                     TuTh 2:00PM - 3:20PM

This course offers a historical survey of the art of India, China, and Japan from ca. 10,000 BC to the 21st century. Students will explore a variety of art objects including architecture, sculpture, and painting. Strong emphasis will be placed on the aesthetic sensibilities which affect the arts, the impact of Buddhism, and methods and materials used in creating East Asian art.

 

ARTH 3042 Early Modern Japanese Art (3 credit hours; BOK: CT)

001         15324                     TuTh 3:30PM - 4:50PM

This is an intermediate-level survey of Japanese art from the Edo Period (1603-1868), a period of internal peace, material prosperity, and artistic diversity. Students will study paintings, woodblock prints, and decorative arts produced fora variety of clientele. They will also be introduced to the dynamic interaction between artists and the contemporary socio-cultural trends, including the rise of urban mass culture. Through a variety of activities including exams, class discussions, and an essay, students will learn to express their understanding of early modern Japanese art.

 

DAAP 2012 Beyond Surface: Fiber, Art and Fashion (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         19959                     Th 6:00PM - 8:50PM
This course will explore fabric, textiles and fibers and their relationship with fashion culture, design and art practices. Students will examine the relationship between material, process, and the maker, as well as the critical role that cloth and fiber processes play in the global economic marketplace. Included in the course is a historical and cultural overview of fabric production including a variety of textile techniques and methods, such as silk screening, textile painting and dyeing, surface manipulation, print and pattern development, mark-making, and beading. Students will compile a portfolio of samples for reference and create an innovative collection of product samples. Class will include guest lectures, studio visits, demonstrations and hands on design projects. This course is designed as an introduction for non-majors as well as a refresher for majors or transfer students.

 

DAAP 2022 The Business of Fashion (3 credit hours; BOK: CM, CT, KI)

001         19399    TuTh 11:00AM-12:20PM

This course will explore fashion retailing and the various business structures in the fashion industry. The primary focus will be on the numerous forms of Fashion Retailing and trends with an exploration of possible fashion-based career paths in retailing and merchandising. This course will include lectures by professionals and experts from industry and local fashion organizations and an industry field trip

 

DAAP 2023 The Style Studies: The London Experience (3 credit hours)

001         19400                     Th 4:00PM - 6:00PM

This international-travel course will educate and expose students to the impact of fashion retailing on aspects of business and society and give them a formational cultural building block for future growth and personal development in this area. London is a cutting edge destination, bridging the European market with the US market. In this course, students will discover these unique differences by exploring the city, both in large international retailers and small start-up boutiques.

 

DAAP 2026 The Art of Jewelry and Leather Accessory Design (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         19960    Tu 6:00PM- 8:50PM

This course explores jewelry and leather design as it relates to contemporary art, fashion, culture and society. The course will offer a balance of art making, broad range of techniques and materials, critiquing, collaboration, and art history knowledge. In addition, the course will include a guest lecture, field trip and demonstrations. Students will investigate the basics of working with non-precious metals, wire, chain, findings, found objects, and selected leathers as an introduction to jewelry fabrication and small scale leather design. These parts will be used collectively to provide students with a working vocabulary, a concrete skill set and understanding of jewelry making and small scale leather processes. Assignments will stress originality, careful planning and design, exploration of materials, and quality craftsmanship. Throughout the semester, students will conceptualize and create their own designs from the techniques learned in the course. This course is designed as an introduction for non-majors as well as skill development for majors or transfer students.

 

DAAP 3001 Interactive Digital Arts (3 credit hours; BOK: IL, KI)

001         19925    MoWe 6:00PM-8:50PM

This course provides an expanded introduction to creating interactive artworks and environments utilizing the open-source Arduino electronics prototyping platform. Students will learn to use and modify open-source code, integration of sensors, and the activation of lights, motors and servos. Graduate level work will seeks a sophisticated conceptual level and Independent project development. The format of this course includes both seminar and studio/lab components.

 

FAA 1022 Basic Rendering the Figure from Life for non-DAAP majors (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         18678                     TuTh 2:00PM - 4:50PM

This course involves an intensive study of the human form working from both clothed and nude models for the non-DAAP student/artist or novice wishing to improve their work from a live model in a two-dimensional painting or drawing medium. The structure and expressive values of the human body are delivered through lectures, demonstrations and lab (studio) application. A progressive emphasis is placed on the human form as a source for compositional motives, culminating in carefully planned drawings or painted sketches that integrate figure and field into complex formal narratives.

 

FAA 1025 Basic Drawing for non-DAAP majors (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         18292                  MoWe 5:00PM - 7:50PM

A course for non-majors that focuses on the creation of drawings that demonstrate an understanding of one and two point perspective and illusionistic space using a variety of black and white and color mediums. The class includes demonstrations, critiques, and discussions of artists who work in drawing. The format of this course includes both seminar and studio/lab components.

 

FAA 1033 Basic Digital Photography for non-DAAP majors (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         18293                  MoWe 5:00PM - 7:50PM

This course comprises lectures and exercises in basic digital photographic technology and aesthetics for non-DAAP majors. The emphasis is on the camera, including camera settings, exposure and focus controls, and composition. Students must provide their own cameras which have a minimum of 6 megapixels, optical zoom, and manual mode OR exposure compensation capability.

 

FAA 1034 Basic Ceramic Handbuilding for non-DAAP majors (3 credit hours; BOK: FA)

001         18680    MoWe 8:00AM- 10:50AM

This course will provide an introduction to hand forming and the technical processes of working with clay. Students will explore hand building with terra cotta as a way to make both functional and expressive works out of clay. We will work with many different building methods, such as coiling, pinch pots, slab building, and the use of molds. This class is will also focus on different methods of decorating and glazing earthenware. No prior ceramic experience is needed for this course. - Prerequisite Definition: To take this course you must: Be enrolled in one of these Programs 40UOP, 35ASC, 35BAC, 35CRT, 15ASC, 15BAC, 15CRT, 15MIN, 35MIN, 32ASC, 32BAC, 32CRT, 32UOP, 16BAC, 16CRT, 16MIN, 20ASC, 20BAC, 20BC, 20CRT, 20MIN, 18ASC, 18BAC, 18BC, 18CRT, 18MIN, 34ASC, 34BAC, 34CRT, 22ASC, 22BAC, 22CRT, 22HON, 22MIN, 26BAC, 26MIN, 29BAC, 25BAC, 36CRT, 28ASC, 28BAC, 28CRT, 38HON, 38CRT.

 

HORT 1010 Horticulture Science I (3 credit hours; BOK: CM, CT, IL)

001         19845                     We 6:00pm- 8:50PM

This course is an introduction to basic horticulture science concepts and principles including the development, growth, distribution, and utilization of fruits, vegetables, and ornamental plants. The course will focus on botanical concepts of plant structure, growth, and development, and the plants' response to environmental conditions and management techniques.

 

002         19848                     TuTh 11:00am- 12:30pm

This course is an introduction to basic horticulture science concepts and principles including the development, growth, distribution, and utilization of fruits, vegetables, and ornamental plants. The course will focus on botanical concepts of plant structure, growth, and development, and the plants' response to environmental conditions and management techniques.

 

HORT 1030 Native Plants and Communities I (3 credit hours; BOK: NS)

001         19930                     Fr 6:00PM - 10:00PM SaSu 9:00AM - 6:00PM SaSu 9:00AM - 6:00PM

The course is a survey of the native plants and plant communities of southwestern Ohio. The course develops an awareness of natural vegetative patterns of central hardwood forest types, prairies, and wetlands, and will discuss issues that threaten native plant communities. The course covers the morphology, taxonomy, and biology of indigenous Eastern US plants in a combination of classroom and field studies.

 

HORT 4080 Hops and History: Introduction to Beer (3 credit hours; BOK: CT)

001         19879                     Tu 6:00PM - 8:50PM

002         19880                     We 6:00PM - 8:50PM

This course is an introduction to beer and the many aspects of beer brewing and drinking that are influenced by culture, history, and geography. Through brewery tours, we will learn the art and science of beer making and ingredients. Through field trips to the Brewery District in Over-the-Rhine we will see how beer has influenced Cincinnati culture and urban form. Beers from around the world will be discussed and tasted to demonstrate a wide range of beer styles, ingredients, and cultural preferences. Students will learn to describe the taste of beer and develop their palette to assess a beer for appearance, aroma, and flavor. Students must be 21years of age or older. A fee will be charged to cover the cost of materials.

 

HORT 4082 Introduction to Wine (3 credit hours; BOK: CT)

001         21327                     Mo 6:30PM - 9:20PM

This course is an introduction to wine and a review of many aspects of wine that are influenced by and influencing culture, history, geography, and economies. Through readings and discussion, this course reviews wine-making, health issues, the senses and their responses to wine, wine and food, and the taste of wine. Wine tastings of over50 examples are designed to present practical experience with how vinification, viticulture, and terroir express themselves in the glass, as well as the differences that vintage, clonal origin and country of origin influence the flavors and textures of the final product. A fee is required to cover the cost of course materials. Students must be 21 years of age or older.

 

PLAN 3093 The Good Life and How to Live It! (3 credit hours; BOK: HU, SE) Honors seminar; students must have a 3.2 or higher GPA

001         16357                     Tu 3:30PM – 6:20PM

All of us dream of living “the good life,” though the mental images we have of it may differ.  Likewise, many of us have carefully thought-out strategies for achieving the good life as we understand it and work hard to implement those strategies.  But what is the good life and what do we need to do to be sure that our own life is a good one?  From the dawn of civilization, philosophers, theologians and poets have conceptualized the good life and recommended ways to achieve it.  They have tried to teach us how to live happily and well.  In this course, we encounter some of the most influential thinkers in Western societies who have dealt with the questions surrounding happiness and good living over more than two millennia.  We read and discuss their thoughts as a way to help us develop our own philosophy of happiness and good living – a philosophy that will inform our personal life choices, console us when we encounter life’s difficulties, and guide us in our roles as friends and engaged citizens who care about the happiness of others.

 

NOTES:

All Horticulture courses are open for non-DAAP students, provided they have met the appropriate prerequisites or have permission of the instructor.

All of the SOP courses are open to non-DAAP majors. This is based on seating availability which we have not found to be a problem in the past. Our studios (PLAN 1012, 3031) and capstones/thesis (PLAN 5099, 7008, 7009) courses will allow non-DAAP majors if the topic pertains to their area of study and they possess the skills and ability to join the course. These courses would require professor permission for non-DAAP majors to enroll.

Questions? Contact DAAP Student Affairs at 556-1376. Thank you!

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Questions about a non-DAAP major course?

Contact us!

513-556-1376

daap-admissions@uc.edu